Permaculture Design Certificate

I first heard the word ‘Permaculture’ way back in 2007 when we bumped into some like-minded folk while travelling in our old bus. I had been interested in all things green since childhood but it was wonderful for me to find out about the existence of a movement that pulled together so many areas that I was interested in. We immediately subscribed to Permaculture magazine and set about making our lives more sustainable; growing veg at home, raising chickens, embracing voluntary simplicity and making the choice not to go back into full-time work after the birth of our first daughter and to be economically poor but time rich!

At the end of 2011 I finally signed up to do my Permaculture Design Certificate. The PDC is a 72 hour curriculum, normally split into 14 days of study . My PDC was over 7 weekends in 2012 Jan- July. It was amazing. I laughed, I cried, I learnt so much, I had some weird experiences and a couple of profound ones. I met fantastic people, pushed myself to the edges of my comfort zone and took many more steps along my journey into the wonderful world of Permaculture.

This year (2014) I have been again attending a PDC, this time as an ‘interloper’ helping out around the edges of the course. One of the special things about the PDC is that once you hold the certificate, you are welcome to attend other courses to help, learn and progress the spread of Permaculture in your area. For the Leicester PDC I have led some morning circle activities, guilded, took part in activities, presented one of my designs and enjoyed listening to the ever knowledgeable PDC tutor Hannah Thorogood. Going over old ground was very useful to me. I feel that I have a stronger grip on the design processes and tools this time around the cycle of the PDC.

I was asked to take photographs on the last day of the course to document the group presenting their designs. Each participant, helper or teacher, had five minutes in which to very briefly describe their design and the tools and processes they used. I think we all found it challenging to squeeze our talks into such a tight time-frame. But it really was fascinating to view 14 people’s very diverse takes on Permaculture designs in one hectic morning. It was just lovely to meet with such inspiring people on a regular basis, I will miss these weekends, please do keep in touch everyone. Enjoy the photos. xx

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Anna’s design was for her garden. It included a summerhouse made from recycled windows. IMG_4795 IMG_4798

Marie also created a garden design for her typically sized backyard. IMG_4800 IMG_4801

Emma lives on a boat, so her plan was for her outside growing space, her allotment.IMG_4803 IMG_4805

Chess is another boat dweller, her land is quite extensive and her plan looked at adding to her food forest and annual beds. IMG_4807IMG_4808

Liz is hoping to move to Dorset/ Devon in the near future and build her own home. Her design looked at one possible location for this and designed her home and garden. IMG_4810 IMG_4811

Ben used Permaculture to design his outdoor space at his home. He has a small yard that he wanted to use effectivly for his family to enjoy.IMG_4813 IMG_4814

Laura worked on a fantasy design for her ideal family garden for herself and her two young boys. She is currently house-hunting and amazingly the garden design fits perfectly into the outdoor space of a house she is keen to buy. IMG_4817 IMG_4818

Martin owns two houses one of which he rents out as a communal living space and he runs yoga retreats. His design looked at ways of improving his land and lifesytle possibilities. IMG_4821 IMG_4822

Jessie drew a beautiful tree to illustrate her journey over the past year towards buying her own home. She has decided to buy a boat with her partner Reevesie.IMG_4824IMG_4823

I  designed a system for running Muddy Boots Allotment playgroup. I split tasks into four chunks which followed the seasons, the action learning cycle and Looby’s design web. IMG_4832 IMG_4837

Ann presented a tweak to one of her designs for her gardening business. She has taken on a new worker and discussed how Permaculture has helped her with this change. IMG_4835 IMG_4836

Sarah is the lead designer on an impressive community land-share project called Whistlewood common. She shared a brief overview of setting up the organisation.IMG_4839 IMG_4841

Reevesie looked at his livelihood and choices for furthering his career. He used an interesting technique to ensure he kept to the 5 minute timescale by using slides that moved on automatically every 30 seconds. IMG_4843 IMG_4844

Sam’s design looked at desert Permaculture. Her partner lives in Arizona and together they are re-designing his house and garden to best suit the challenges of the climate. IMG_4846 IMG_4847

And finally our tutor Hannah shared with us her design for a multi-purpose field shelter that she is currently building on her small-holding in Lincolnshire. IMG_4848 IMG_4849

Certificates were handed out at the end of the day. Each participant presented a certificate to another group member after saying a few words about that person. It was very touching

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2 thoughts on “Permaculture Design Certificate

  1. I love events like this! The drawings are great…. The presentation technique used by Reevesie is called Pecha Kucha, I believe.

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