Twelve principles for twelve months – or not!

So its another big fail for me on this task. I hold my hands up and admit that keeping up with my monthly principles blog post has been rubbish this year. My life has filled up with vital tasks and some days I feel like I am just barely holding onto the roller coaster!

In November I was due to look at ‘Use biological resources’ and December was ‘Small scale intensive systems’. My brain is too full of Christmas tasks left undone to tackle these now. So I am going to give myself a free-pass and quit this.

So here is a beautiful photo that I took last easter in Wales instead!

Happy Winter solstice everyone xxIMG_5970

 

Twelve Principles for twelve months – an update

Throughout 2015 I will be looking at Bill Mollison’s Permaculture Principles.           I have allocated one principle per month at random. I will aim to find a relevant image, some quotations around the subject, some possible applications and a challenge for myself that relates to the Principle and the Permaculture activity I am involved in at that time.

IMG_9734This photos shows a rainbow chard plant growing in my garden. It stays vibrant for months, the ruby-red colour shine out and draws my eye every time I walk past. I love the parallels in appearance with a tree. if you look carefully you can imagine the stem and branches. The stem is like permaculture principles, keeping us strong and nourished in all that we do.

Oh my goodness, I have been so rubbish at sticking to this aim. The last time I blogged on this subject was back in June. So here is an update about what I have done and what I should have done…

July and August. I allocated two months over the summer to look at the attitudinal principles; for example, ‘everything gardens’ ‘Yield is limited only by the imagination of the gardener’ and ‘the problem is the solution’ I confess that I skived off. I decided to take time off, concentrate only on vital tasks and enjoy time with my family. So I will return to these principles next year.

September. Each element performs many functions. 

October. Each function is supported by many elements. 

Quotations

“Each element in the system should be chosen and placed so that it performs as many functions as possible. Use relative location so elements with diverse functions have their qualities perpetuated” treeyopermacultureedu.wordpress.com

“In a permaculture design, each element has many functions, the minimum being three. Having three or more functions helps create a stable and diverse food growing system because each element is connected together, making energy cycle through the system rather than being lost as wastes, i.e. food production can be connected to animal husbandry, composting, useful structures etc… This diverse food growing ecosystem is the opposite to a monoculture which only has one yield and is of little or no benefit to the surrounding eco-system.” http://www.permaculture.co.uk

“In a sustainable design, important functions are supported by more than one element. The more elements there are to support an individual function, the more stable and safe the overall system will be in the event of any one element failing” http://www.permaculture.co.uk

 

Application 

I looked at these two principles together as they are like two sides of one coin. I thought about my career path and how linked or otherwise the elements of it were. I looked at the functions of my career, what it does, (makes an income and gives me fulfillment) Then I looked at the elements, all the separate activities that I do. (Studying, teaching, training etc) I draw lines to link up these areas and created this crazy scribble below! In Permaculture we call it a ‘web of connections’ I discovered that all separate elements of my career are all very interlinked. I think this gives me meaning, cohesion and resilience. Pretty good I thought!

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Challenge

October is almost over so I will not be setting myself a challenge this month. I will however aim to complete this project over the coming months. In November I am looking at ‘Use biological resources’ and December will be ‘Small scale intensive systems’

 

Twelve Principles for twelve months – June -Relative location

Throughout 2015 I will be looking at Bill Mollison’s Permaculture Principles.           I have allocated one principle per month at random. I will aim to find a relevant image, some quotations around the subject, some possible applications and a challenge for myself that relates to the Principle and the Permaculture activity I am involved in at that time. June – Relative location

IMG_2167This image shows the importance of relative location in gardening terms. By placing my seedlings close to the chicken pen, I walk past them twice at day at least and can easily see which need watering, potting on or rescuing from a snail!

QUOTATIONS

The core of permaculture is design, and design is a connection between things             Bill Mollison

Relative Location dictates the need for elements to be arranged so they can create functional interconnections.  It is wonderful for a landscape to contain numerous elements such as pond, chickens, and trees, but if these elements do not interrelate in a beneficial way then we have not designed properly.                 treeyopermacultureedu.wordpress.com

In Permaculture our primary concern is with the relationship between things, and how they interact, rather than with the things themselves. So, in Permaculture design, we focus on the connection between things, and by understanding the nature of the elements, and how they benefit each other, we can determine the optimum location for them. http://deepgreenpermaculture.com

APPLICATION

Putting the right thing in the right place should be applied in all areas of people’s lives. Placing the tea bags and the mugs close to the kettle is one obvious application, as it having your herb pot just outside the backdoor. Relative location is a very important part of Permaculture design. Once you have decided on the elements you want to use, then consider the ways in which they connect together and how you could place them to make the greatest number of positive connections. I like to make a ‘web of connections’ as shown in the photo below. This example ended up begin rather too complicated, but you can get the general idea of how it works.

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CHALLENGE

My challenge this month is to continue planting up my summer garden, considering where I place the plants and trying to make useful connections between them. For example. I have just one raised bed left to plant up now. Until yesterday it had the chicken run over it, I designed this to fit perfectly over the raised beds. Our broody hen, Aggie and her chicks have spent the last 6 weeks on this bed, turning over the soil and adding their manure to it. The chicks are now big enough to join their cousins in the main run and the bed is ready for planting into! Lots of useful connections made there in the placement of elements of my garden design. IMG_6246Here they are at about 1 week old. They are much bigger and beautifully feathered now.

My second challenge is to spend some time thinking about where in the house I work. We don’t have a spare room, so I work from home at the family computer in the living room. This works well if everyone else is out of the house, but more often than not I am trying to squeeze in moments to work while wrangling three kids. As I am sure you can imaging, interruptions are many and varied! My piles of papers get knocked over and used for paper aeroplanes or drawing of cats. The computer is pressed into action to watch Ceebies or Netflix and I am generally very frustrated with the situation.

Something needs to change and fast! I need a cheap ( ideally free) solution that still allows me to make useful connections with family life, but have a little more peace and quiet to work. Ideally I’d love to buy/build a summer-house and pop it into the garden to work in. But for the time-being it’s probably going to be a solution more like shifting the furniture around. I will keep on pondering on this problems this month and post again if I find a good solution.

 

 

Twelve principles for twelve months – May – Diversity

Throughout 2015 I will be looking at Bill Mollison’s Permaculture Principles.           I have allocated one principle per month at random. I will aim to find a relevant image, some quotations around the subject, some possible applications and a challenge for myself that relates to the Principle and the Permaculture activity I am involved in at that time. May – Diversity

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This photograph shows the diversity of berries that we are growing in our garden. We have lots of soft fruit; strawberries, wild strawberries, gooseberries, blackcurrants, red currants, raspberries, white currants and blackberries. This provides us with many weeks worth of successional cropping when its possible to pick a handful of berries to decorate the morning cereal. This was an intentional part of my garden design, I didn’t need rows and rows of the same berry, but instead dotted lots of different berry plants around the garden, taking advantage of the different niches that were available.

QUOTATIONS

Today I have taken all of my quotations from websites. On googling ‘Diversity, Permaculture’ so much useful information came to light. If any of my readers want to learn more on this fascinating subject, then a quick google search or follow the links below should provide you with a wealth of information.

Permaculture designs should always try to incorporate a wide variety of plants, animals and approaches. This is not just for the sake of it, but because diversity can act like an insurance policy – if one crop fails, another may succeed. Even within an orchard there will be a diversity of different varieties. Take apples as an example. A healthy diverse orchard will contain early flowering, late flowering, eaters, and cookers. If an early frost gets some, others will be popping out flowers later on.                                                           Permaculture Association website https://www.permaculture.org.uk/

Permaculture design aims for as much diversity and variety as possible. It is the exact opposite to conventional agriculture, which relies on huge monocultures and struggles with all the associated problems.                                          http://www.tropicalpermaculture.com

…the design principle of Diversity shows us that, just like in Nature, when we combine many plant species together that have a beneficial relationship to one other, they in fact grow better, produce higher yields, resists pests and diseases and are overall much more resilient in such a system. When we include animals in our design and place them where they can work harmoniously with the rest of the system, we further gain many more benefits from the synergy created. The most important point to remember with the design principle of diversity is that what is important is the total number of functional relationships between elements in the design, not the total number of elements themselves                   deepgreenpermaculture.com

APPLICATIONS

The important of having a wide diversity of different types of plants in your garden is well documented in Permaculture. One way that I like to apply this thinking is through the creation of ‘Guilds’ Guilds are groupings of plants that are carefully considered and planted close together to support each other’s growth. I have various guilds set up in my garden and at the community allotment. I wrote about an apple tree guild I created a few years ago here https://nurturegreen.wordpress.com/2014/05/05/reflections-on-april/

CHALLENGE

A challenge that I am currently facing is how to manage the diversity in my working life. Permaculture has taught me that a diverse career is a stable one. I have developed a poly-income for myself, which is rewarding but can prove tricky. This spring as well as raising three children and running a household I am teaching photography, studying for a Permaculture diploma, shadowing a PDC, running an outdoor playgroup, writing a blog, raising chickens, helping my sister look after her tiny baby, training to be a Forest school teacher and growing food for my family. Phew. I am also trying to be a good wife, daughter, sister, friend, neighbour and mother. That huge list of roles can make for some difficult diary management and multiple epic to-do lists!

So my ongoing challenge is to work with the diversity in my life, work out what to prioritize, figure out the best way to juggle my roles and find a way to fulfill my voluntary obligations, hit my study targets and balance the books. I am just about keeping my head above water at the moment but I think I am far busier than I have ever been in my life. Each available moment is full to bursting but I feel grateful that it is all such interesting stuff and that lots of wonderful doors are opening for me all the time. Exciting times!

 

Twelve Principles for twelve months – April – Accelerate succession and evolution

Throughout 2015 I will be looking at Bill Mollison’s Permaculture Principles.           I have allocated one principle per month at random. I will aim to find a relevant image, some quotations around the subject, some possible applications and a challenge for myself that relates to the Principle and the Permaculture activity I am involved in at that time. April – Accelerate succession and evolution 

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This image show wild garlic appearing this month in my garden. I have tried to use ideas I have learnt about Forest gardens and use edible plants that have similar traits to ‘pioneer plants’ or weeds. These plants are happy to grow in poor soil or neglected areas of my garden, they look after themselves and still provide me with a yield. Weeds are often the first plants to appear in the evolution of a garden. They enrich the soil and eventually make it more inhabitable for other more desirable plants.

This Principle is quite a difficult one, and one that does not really appear in any form in the 12 Holmgren principles. So I thought I would begin by defining the terms and under the ‘application’ heading I will considering what they could mean for my Permaculture journey.

Accelerate – To speed up

Succession –  The act or process of following in order or sequence.

Evolution – The gradual development of something.

So basically this principle is saying that we should seek to find ways in which to speed up the changes which naturally occur in a system and ensure that these changes are positive.

QUOTATIONS

Accelerate Succession and Evolution: direct plants, animals, and soil life towards complexity and diversity to build our own climax species in a shorter time, forward your agriculture systems to more permanence, whether it is a grassland or a food forest. Utilize invasive species to your advantage; substitute your own pioneers and climax species that have multiple functions.                             Bill Mollison ‘Introduction to Permaculture’

Bill Mollison offered four objectives for fulfilling this principles in our design and management work

  • Using what is already growing
  • Introduce plants that will easily survive
  • Raising organic levels artificially
  • Substituting our own herb, pioneer, and climax species

APPLICATION

I use this principle in my garden by observing which weeds grow well in which areas, then substituting them for similar plants that I have a use for. This speeds up the process of experimentation by ensuring the right plant ends up in the right place by following natures blueprint.

I am also using this principle in my career. I am trying to speed up the evolution of my career by a number of related processes;

1. Linking disparate areas that I am working on and stacking their functions. For example, my Forest schools training course requires me to plan, run and reflect on six practical sessions. This process can be written up as part of my Permaculture diploma as well for my FS training. These six sessions may be used as my Muddy Boots autumn season.

2. Seeking volunteering opportunities for Permaculture teaching and Forest school leadership. This helps me to network effectively, furthers my knowledge and practical experiences as well as being worthwhile activity that counts towards my courses.

3. Using Permaculture principles and techniques in the planning of Muddy Boots allotment playgroup. Also using new skills and ideas learnt in FS training in these session. This improves my environmental education practice and gives me a chance to test out idea for my FS assessment.

CHALLENGE

I can see this principle at work in the way my tutor Hannah Thorogood manages the PDC that I help out on. Year 1- people attend the PDC. Year 2 -people are encouraged to attend the course for a second time and help out around the edges, making tea, talking with participants etc. Year 3 – people are encouraged to take a more active role n the publicity and facilitation of the course and lead some aspects of the morning circle. Year 4- people are encouraged to facilitate the course or take a Permaculture teacher training course and lead some sessions. Year 5 – Hannah steps away to lead PDC’s elsewhere and the local course is self-sustainable and led by previous participants. We are in year 4 here and this example of evolution seems to be working quite well. We have a planning meeting next month to discuss how the PDC will work in years to come and to decide who wants to teach which areas of the course.

So my challenge this month is to really think about what I want my involvement in the local PDC to be. Do I want to do the TOT and train to teach PDC’s in the future? Do I want to write my own PDC aimed at children/teenagers/family groups? Do I want to investigate accreditation for PDC courses with a view to including them in school curriculums? Lots to think about here.

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And finally this image shows how I ‘Accelerate succession and evolution’ in my flock of chickens, by buying in fertile eggs from breeds I am interested in and choosing the best broody hens to sit on the eggs and care for the chicks. This is one of last years chicks, in another 10 days we should be hearing the ‘Peep’ of new little chicks hatching out!

Happy Easter!  

 

Twelve Principles for twelve months – March – Efficient energy planning

Throughout 2015 I will be looking at Bill Mollison’s Permaculture Principles. I have allocated one principle per month at random. I will aim to find a relevant image, some quotations around the subject, some possible applications and a challenge for myself that relates to the principle and the Permaculture activity I am involved in at that time. March – Efficient energy planning

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It was hard to find an image that demonstrates the principle of ‘efficient energy planning’!   I finally settled on this one, of the abundant fresh produce harvested from my garden one day in August, and here is why… Years ago we used to have an allotment. It was about a mile from our house, so we used to walk or cycle there which took 30 mins at least. We began by spending whole weekends tending our plot. After a while we started renovating our house and this squeezed our available time to devote to the allotment. A few more years passed and we had our first child, by this point our free time to spend on the plot was minimal and by the time we had travelled there our daughter was fed up of being in her pushchair and needing our attention. So the allotment got more and more neglected and eventually we gave it up.

Soon after that we moved house to our current home with a huge south-facing garden. We now grow our fruit and veg in the garden, so we have only to step outside the back door to tend to our plants. We now have three children so there would be no way we could make the two mile round trip and devote the time required to the upkeep of an allotment, but by growing our food where we spend all our time, the garden gets attention little and often, And the results are wonderful! This demonstrates the importance of efficient energy planning in terms of Zoning, placing items used most often, closest to your home. The purpose of this is to minimise wasted energy in your system.

QUOTATIONS

Zoning is a conceptional design tool used for managing our own energies. Radiating out from the centre are zones one to five. Zone 00 is the self at the centre. On a land based design, elements that are in need of the most attention are placed nearer to the home and yourself than those that require less frequent attention.                                                                                                                 L. Macnamara. People and Permaculture 2012

Efficient energy planning is all about three things: zones, sectors, and slope. Using these three categories, you can set up your homestead so that you will need to use the least energy possible. This means energy from people and energy in other forms such as wind or water. In order to get the most accomplished in the least amount of time, increasing efficiency you should follow these ideas.                                                                         New England Permaculture Homestead blog  www.nepermhome.wordpress.com

 

We make every effort to put in structures that will produce or conserve energy, rather than structures that will continuously consume energy. Our aim is to catch, store and use energy before it is lost from the system.                                                                                                                  Ross and Jenny Mars. Getting Started in Permaculture 1994 

APPLICATIONS

1. Putting items needing to go upstairs into a basket placed on the bottom step and carrying them all up in one go at the end of the day rather than making multiple trips up and down the stairs throughout the day.

2. Storing water close to where it is needed, ideally at the top elevation of your site so that it can be moved with minimal effort using gravity.

3. Planting your herbs just outside the backdoor, so you can easily grab a handful while cooking dinner, ideally without even needing to put on your shoes!

CHALLENGE

I knew that this month would be a hectic one for me, as I am embarking on a number of different training courses and projects that are demanding of my time. So in order to efficiently plan my energy, I decided to get a leg-up on this challenge by completing it a few weeks ago. I wanted to look at my Permaculture Diploma in terms of Zoning and ensure that I had a good handle on what my diploma designs were going to be and how they fitted into the zones of my life. The diagram below shows zones in my life and ideas for related designs slotted into the relevant zone. This can help me decide which designs to prioritise by indicating how closely they are related to the centre of my life, my Zone 00.

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Twelve Principles for twelve months – February – Edge effect

Throughout 2015 I will be looking at Bill Mollison’s Permaculture Principles. I have allocated one principle per month at random. I will aim to find a relevant image, some quotations around the subject, some possible applications and a challenge for myself that relates to the principle and the Permaculture activity I am involved in at that time. February – Edge effect

imageThis image shows how materials collect where one material meets another and an edge is created. Here fallen leaves accumulate along a kerb. This principle could be applied in a garden, for example to capture materials alongside the edges of a raised bed and add beneficial nutrients to the soil.

QUOTATIONS

“Edges are places of varied ecology as they share resources between two distinct ecosystems and are known as a net and sieve for energy. We can increase the yield of the system by manipulating where two ecosystems meet, and designing in their unique species. Here the patterns of nature merge to utilize their inspiration with our creativity.” Bill Mollison. ‘Introduction to Permaculture’

“Edges themselves are often very diverse. Many of the species from both ecosystems live there together with some that live only on the edge, giving more species diversity than the interior of either ecosystem.”                                                                                    Patrick Whitefield. ‘The Earth Care Manual’

When we are in the edge between illness and health, and on the road to recovery, we can use our wellness to create more wellness… There is a familiar pattern of trying to step out of the edge too quickly and thinking we are well again, doing too much and then relapsing. This edge period needs to contain a balance of relaxation and activity. There are advantages of staying in the edge, it is a good place to take time to reassess and create new patterns, and to make sure that wellness can really take root in our lives.           Looby Macnamara For Permaculture magazine 

APPLICATIONS To create a successful garden pond, it is important to consider the edges. A pond with straight vertical sides will be uninviting to wildlife. Whereas a pond with gently curving undulating edges and a variety of depths will create niches suitable for a multitude of life forms to inhabit.

Keyhole and mandala gardens are much used in Permaculture. Garden beds in these shapes provide easy access and produce many different spaces suited to different plants. Curved edges are more pleasing to the eye than straight edges and they follow nature more closely too. something we always try to do in permaculture. Personally I have found it challenging to fit curved beds into my garden as it is narrow and long, but I certainly like the theory behind the idea.

CHALLENGE I am going to use the edges of my day to be as productive as possible. I plan to use early mornings and the few hours between the kids going to sleep and my own bedtime for exercise and diploma work. These quiet moments are currently under used parts of my day and they have the benefit of providing time for me to be alone. My brain is most active early in the morning, so it’s a great time to write to-do lists and make plans. I also find that I have good ideas whilst running, particularly at dusk as my mind is concentrated on the task at hand and the general brain-chatter is silenced. However I must remember to write down my ideas as soon as I arrive home before the daily chaos rushes in again.

Another challenge for this month is to push myself to the edge of my comfort zone. When you stretch yourself, important things can happen. When you run a little faster or further than you are really comfortable with, something amazing happens, you get fitter! Likewise when you take on an uncomfortable challenge, such as attending a scary meeting or daring to speak up against an opinionated friend, you find new strength and confidence in your own abilities.

Another thing I want to do is try to overlap some of the projects that I am working on to create new edges. Lots of my activity has areas in common, such as the outdoor playgroup and Forest schools training. Both are involved in helping children engage with nature. So rather than keeping these parts of my life apart, I hope to ‘Integrate rather than segregate’ and join up my thinking. I hope this will make my life easier and create new abundant edges, sparking off new ideas and creative ways of working.

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Twelve Principles for twelve months. January. ‘Energy cycling’

Throughout 2015 I will be looking at Bill Mollison’s Permaculture Principles. I have allocated one principle per month at random. I will aim to find a relevant image, some quotations around the subject, some possible applications and a challenge for myself that relates to the principle and the Permaculture activity I am involved in at that time.

January ‘Energy cycling’

IMG_5344The image shows a leaf that has recently fallen from an oak tree and come to settle on the snowy ground in my local woods. It will be broken down by the actions of time, life-forms and the weather. As it decomposes it brings life to the forest floor and add fertility to allow more trees to grow, bloom, then drop their leaves in turn and continue the cycle. 

QUOTATIONS

“Our work as Permaculture designers is to prevent energy leaving before the basic needs of the whole system are satisfied, so that growth, reproduction and maintenance continue in our living components”                                                                              Bill Mollison

“Energy Cycling: Permaculture systems intend to stop the flow of energies off-site and instead turn them into cycles. The interaction between plants and animals produces energy, which is caught, stored, used and re-cycled. Incoming energy –sun, water, wind, manures– are used at its highest possible use, then its next highest, and so on. “Source to sink”: moving water across the landscape in a series of interlinking ponds to prevent erosive runoff. Cascading nutrients: turning the waste of one product into a multitude of other products using various life kingdoms i.e. plants, animals, bacteria, and fungus. Kitchen wastes to compost, animal manure to biogas, grey water to the garden.”                                                              Bill Mollison ‘Introduction to Permaculture’ 

“Design to make the best use of any energy or resources moving through a site. Link as many elements together as you can to create self-sustaining cyclic systems.”                                                                     Aranya ‘Permaculture design a step-by-step guide’

APPLICATIONS

I use this principle in my garden. I use prunings, weedings, animal bedding and food scraps to add to my compost bin or compost in place to return fertility to the soil. My local council supply ‘green’ bins for garden scraps but I declined to take one. I see my neighbours filling up these bins every week at the same time as buying compost from the garden centre. By keeping the fertility in my garden I hope to avoid having to buy in too much additional fertility from outside the system.

CHALLENGE

I wondered if I could apply this principle to a Zone 00 design (zone 00 means the self) I am working on a design currently about health, nutrition and exercise. Personal energy or lack of it has been a big issue for me over the last eight years of baby-raising and broken sleep. I felt very much like I needed to retain my energy whenever possible, so resisted exercising for a long time as I felt I did not have spare energy to burn. However, my attitude has now changed as I have began building exercise into my life and noticing that it actually inputs energy into my life.

I have done a quick input/output analysis and looked at where I could make links between energy needs and yields and ensure energy is being cycled around the system. I noticed how interlinked five elements were, getting enough sleep, eating a healthy diet, taking exercise, achieving my tasks and finding time for myself. If one of these elements fails for any reason, then the whole system is thrown into disarray. So how can I ensure these energy needs are satisfied, energy continues to cycle and the system remains resilient? That is my challenge for this month.

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Twelve Principles for twelve months – December – Use and value renewable resources and services

 

Throughout 2014, I have been looking at one of David Holmgren’s Permaculture principles each month. I have tried to apply a principle to my life and the activity that I am involved in. My aim was to try to memorize them and try to understand a few applications for each principle. It has been a really interesting process for me. Here is a reminder of all twelve.

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I have left this month’s Principle ‘Use and value renewable resources and services’ until last. I think that is because I find it a tricky one. I can see how this applies to the big picture, for example using solar, wind and wave power. Or planting more tree than we cut down. But I find it harder to see how to apply it to my life in smaller domestic ways.

I actually think it is a Principle that encompasses a large area. ‘Use’ and ‘Value’ are two separate things, as are ‘resources’ and ‘services’. I think people are included in this mention of ‘services’. and it is vitally important to value the services people provide for us. You could design the most perfect Permaculture garden in the world, but without the people to plant, tend and harvest it, it would never come to fruition. I think I have realised this year the importance of people and carefully designing around the people and their needs in all the designs that I undertake. People care is vitally important in designing a successful system.

This month, reflecting on this Principle I have been heating my house with wood and using solar-powered fairy lights. I have been grateful to my husband for sourcing, stacking and chopping the wood. I have been grateful to have the technology to light up my garden and deck using just the power of the sun. I have also tried to give something back to other people. I know that consumer goods are not truly ‘renewable’ but they certainly can be better used than many of us manage. I have donated goods to the local women and children’s refuge and passed on bags and bags of baby clothes to my sister and to a friend. These are goods that have served me well and I have valued. I like to think that they will now be used again rather than sitting in my attic or ending up in landfill.

In 2015 I am planning on continuing this project by looking at one of Bill Mollison’s Permaculture Principles each month. More on this coming up in January.

Twelve Principles for twelve months – November- Creatively use and respond to change

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How do you interpret this image? Is it the sun? Or a flower? Or something else?

Our individual perceptions can change how we view the world and shape our choices.

The Principle I am looking at during November is ‘Creatively use and respond to change’ So I will be looking at changes that have occurred or that need to occur in my life and considering how to interpret and respond to them.

1. I will be reflecting on my garden design for 2014 and planning in changes to make the design more effective for 2015.

2. I will be looking at my daily routine and rhythms and considering changes to make as we enter the darker part of the year.

3. I will be looking at positive changes to my health, diet and exercise and working on my health and nutrition design.

4. All three of my children seem to be entering new phases of development currently, so I will be researching, reading up and considering ways of helping them to cope better with their changes. I hope to limit the frustration that the kids are all feeling currently for their own unique reasons.

By the way, the image I asked you to consider at the start of this post is of the bottom of a pumpkin, it really looks like the sun to me, isn’t nature amazing and beautiful!